reptilian romance

Sunbathing

Sunbathing

Where do American Alligators sunbathe? Anywhere they want to.

Adult males grow up to 15 feet in length and are able to lunge too quickly for my comfort. I have seen alligators fight each other in the water and it’s an impressive sight, what with water splaying everywhere and fish jumping like popcorn. These creatures with a brain the size of a walnut have my respect. Just a flick of their tail can break your leg. Opportunistic feeders, like unto an American teenage boy, they eat anything they can grab. On occasion, that extends from waterfowl and fish to include human- kind. Therefore, I have chosen to capture their appealing images with a   l  o  n  g   lens.

Gators like Florida and tourists travel from all over the world just to see them. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been intent on spotting a rare migrating bird just to have a well-meaning visitor rush over to proclaim, “Look, there’s an alligator!” I smile and nod. There are about 2 million alligators in Florida.

Out for a Casual Swim

Out for a Casual Swim

Alligators know how to kick back. They’ve mastered the art of enjoying down time. If they’re not cruising lazily and often deceptively beneath glittering eyes and pointy nostrils, they’re baking their cold blooded hides in the South Florida sunshine.

Nap Time

Nap Time

As you may discern, I’ve never been too impressed by gators. That is until one day in early spring while walking the Anhinga Trail in Everglades National Park.  A noise in the bushes that resembled a heavy piece of road-building equipment revving its engine caught my attention. Then I heard another and another. Unaware of any monumental construction projects in the Park I determined that gator mating season must have begun. Male gators, during April and May, indulge in impressing and suppressing the beauty, or should I say beauties, of their choice. This is done, in part, by throwing back their head and roaring like a lion. This earth shaking rumbling is also useful in driving off the male competition. These two males engaged in a “I can roar louder than you can” rivalry in front of a seemingly unimpressed female.

How Low Can You Go

How Low Can You Go

The smaller gator in the middle suddenly took off for the other side of the trail. I assume he lost the game and forfeited the prize. The larger gator just kept on rumbling. It’s amazing what a bit of testosterone can do.

Virtuoso

Virtuoso

On a recent trip to the Glades, I got to see gator courtship in action.  A very large male positioned himself across the canal, arched his back, and began to engage in a series of rhythmic raise-your-head-and-roar, lower-your-back-and-vibrate-the-water moves. His intended approached and gently laid an admiring clawed forelimb on his back.

Sing it Again, Big Boy

Sing it Again, Big Boy

When behemoth boyfriend lowered his back until just his scutes, or ridges of bony back plates, broke the water he deepened his roar and began infrasound bellowing. Infrasound is lower than the level of human hearing, for which I am so grateful, but perfect for making the water dance across his back. To be honest, it’s a pretty impressive show even for this observing female.

Oooo, Love Those Vibes!

Oooo, Love Those Vibes!

The gig must have worked. The lady moved over to the gentleman’s side and held her head up, too. Not terribly acquainted with gator body language I can only assume that she was hooked.

A Match

A Match

This female gator has probably gone off to build her nest. Her mate, a playboy at heart, has gone on to other pursuits. She will lay 20-50 eggs and cover them with enough rotting debris to keep them warm. Momma gator hangs around for about 65 days until she hears her little ones croaking as they break through their shells. She diggs them free and protects them until they are self-sufficient at about 5 months of age.

Even gators are cute when they’re young–don’t you think?

Cute Little Gator

Cute Little Gator

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “reptilian romance

  1. This is an interesting series. I understand your choice of lens Karen 🙂
    Thank you for catching and presenting this scene which only very few of us will ever have the possibility – and luck – to watch.
    I’m impressed by the ‘infrasound’ image.

  2. Very cool! From a safe distance, of course. Don’t you feel voyeuristic? 🙂 I guess being that loud serves to discourage other animals from being too close and give the lovers some privacy. Your writing is as delightful as your photos. Great job, Mom!

  3. Wow!! I haven’t stopped by for awhile, and I regret it! Karen, this entire PAGE of photos is jawdrop gorgeous, each photo as special as the next!!! I need to come back when I can take the proper amount of time to study them. You are quite an artist! What a pleasure to view your work.
    And yes, even baby gators are cute! lol

  4. To each of you, thank you! I had been putting off posting on alligators until I happened on the last two courting gators. When I was able to capture several photos of dancing water on the male’s back, then I knew I had to share.

    Katy and Carsten, I truly am blessed to witness such things. I dare not take the opportunities I have for granted.

    Kelly, I never saw myself as a “peeping Tom” in that the gators have chosen to go “public.” I understand that actual mating is often done at night. I appreciate their discretion. 🙂

    Kanniduba and Susan, you are too generous. I’m glad you enjoyed my photos.

    Be sure you check Kanniduba’s blogsite. You won’t be disappointed!

  5. Wow, it’s awesome that you had a chance to see and take pictures of this amazing alligator behavior! I’m glad that you’re keeping your distance from these unpredictable creatures. Thanks for sharing and well done!!!

  6. I am a teacher at Grandview Elementary in Junction City, Kansas. Our school mascot is the Gator. I gave some of my 5th grade students the task of researching alligators and finding characters of the animal gator that model characteristics of the Grandview Gators. I was so impressed with their findings and connections they made. One of the connections they said is that gators are trustworthy. They said that because alligators allow birds to pick things out of their teeth, the birds are able to trust the gators. This is just one of the many life skills they connected to the alligator. They want to create posters with these life skills. I have been looking for a picture of a gator with a bird on its snout for a poster. If anyone has a good one, could you please direct me to the right area?

    Thanks.

    • Hello, Erin. As a former teacher, I admire you for empowering your students through research. I see a lot of alligators, but I haven’t seen one with a bird on its snout. If I do, I’ll be sure to capture the image and send it to you. You might have your students contact Everglades National Park. The rangers there are quite helpful.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: